Mark your calendars! Upcoming DVMA meeting

Friends! The first meeting of the DVMA will be held on September 16, 1pm-5pm, at the University of Pennsylvania, in Van Pelt Library. The theme is "Law and Temporality" and the keynote address will be given by Prof. Ada Kuskowski. We hope to see you there!

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Conference: The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange (Princeton, 5/19-20)

Registration now open.

All lectures take place in the Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building, Room 399

Friday 19 May

1.00-1.30 Pamela Patton and Therese Martin, Welcome
Beatrice Kitzinger, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University
Opening Remarks: “The Treasury, a Material Witness to Long-Distance Contact and Pivot Point for Interdisciplinary Exchange”

1.30-2.00 Therese Martin, Instituto de Historia, CSIC
“Ivory Assemblage as Visual Metaphor: The Beatitudes Casket in Context”

2.00-2.30 Eduardo Manzano, Instituto de Historia, CSIC
“Beyond the Year 900: The ‘Iron Century’ or an Era of Silk?”

2.30-3.00 Discussion
3.00-3.30 Coffee break

3.30-4.00 Ana Cabrera, Victoria and Albert Museum, London/Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid
“Medieval Textiles in León: Material Culture and the Challenges of Conservation”

4.00-4.30 María Judith Feliciano, Independent Scholar and Director, Medieval Textiles in Iberia and the Mediterranean
“Medieval Textiles in León in the Iberian and Mediterranean Context: Towards a Cultural History”

4.30-5.00 Discussion

5.00-5.30 Ana Rodríguez, Instituto de Historia, CSIC
“Narrating the Treasury: What Medieval Iberian Chronicles Choose to Tell Us about Luxury Objects”

5.30-6.00 Julie Harris, Spertus Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership
“Jews, Real and Imagined, at San Isidoro and Beyond”

6.00-6.30 Discussion



Saturday 20 May

10.30-11.00 Pamela Patton, Index of Christian Art, Princeton University
“Demons and Diversity in León”

11.00-11.30 Maribel Fierro, Instituto de Lenguas y Culturas del Mediterráneo y Oriente Próximo, CSIC, and Luis Molina, Escuela de Estudios Árabes de Granada, CSIC
“Christian Relics in al-Andalus”

11.30-12.00 Discussion

12.00-2.00 Lunch break (on your own)

2.00-2.30 Jitske Jasperse, Instituto de Historia, CSIC
“Set in Stone: Questioning the Portable Altar of the Infanta Sancha (d. 1159)”

2.30-3.00 Amanda Dotseth, Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University and Prado Museum, Madrid
“Medieval Treasure and the Modern Museum: Christian and Islamic Objects from San Isidoro de León”

3.00-3.30 Discussion

3.30-4.00 Coffee break

4.00-4.30 Ittai Weinryb, Bard Graduate Center
“The Idea of North”

4.30-5.00 Eva Hoffman, Department of Art and Art History, Tufts University
“Arabic Script as Text and Image on Treasury Objects across the Medieval Mediterranean”

5.00-5.30 Discussion

5.30-6.00 Jerrilynn Dodds, Sarah Lawrence College
Closing Remarks: “The Treasury, Beyond Interaction”

6:00 Wine and cheese reception for all attendees

Rocco Rante, "Evolution of Settlement and Habitat in the Bukhara Oasis between Antiquity and the Islamic Periods" (Penn, 4/6)

Evolution of Settlement and Habitat in the Bukhara Oasis between Antiquity and the Islamic Periods

 
Rocco Rante, Louvre Museum
Thursday, April 6, 2017 at 5:30 pm
Fisher Bennett Hall, University of Pennsylvania
Rooom 224, 3340 Walnut Street
 
This presentation focuses on the evolution of settlements in the Bukhara Oasis resulting by the several transformations of the Zerafšan delta and the evolution of urbanism between the late Antiquity and the Islamic period, mostly concentering on habitat space evolution. The recent geo-archaeological researches directed under the aegis of the Louvre Museum brought to light the water changes of the Zerafšan delta since Neolithic to the Antiquity. These transformations generated changes in human behavior in terms of the occupation of territory as well as of the urban space. This development should be now imputed to the resulting landscape changes that generated a demographic increase and thus an exponential increase of settlements.
 
This lecture co-sponsored by Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, The Middle East Center, Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, and History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania

Our Thanks

The DVMA would like to offer its sincere gratitude to the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries and the Princeton Index of Christian Art for their continued support of our programs.

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